The Royal Navy
#46
Das wäre glaube Ich nicht schlecht.
8 Mutterschiffe mit bis zu 6 Tochterschiffen macht 48 kleine Kampfeinheiten.
AAB.
Zitieren
#47
Sunday Times:

Zitat:THE Royal Navy is considering creating a fleet of giant “mother” ships capable of taking a series of small fast fighting vessels to the world’s trouble spots.
Typically, one of the ships might carry four to six “daughter” vessels that would float from a submerged stern when the mother reached a war zone.



The design is among options for the creation of a “future surface combatant” (FSC) vessel for deployment in 12 years’ time, and is in keeping with the new high-tech direction outlined in Thursday’s defence white paper. Geoff Hoon, the defence secretary, told the Commons he wanted forces to act “quickly, accurately and decisively” in future conflicts.

The mother-ship concept is regarded as the quickest way of transporting smaller vessels over large distances. Once at the scene of a conflict, it would be defended from terrorists or hostile forces by the daughter ships.

One navy source said such a concept would be extremely valuable for operations in the Gulf. “There’s always a threat from small fast boats and innocent-looking boats that carry bombs, like the one that badly damaged the USS Cole in Yemen. And there’s a particular threat from mines,” he said.

Linked by computers to the mother, the daughters would be equipped to fire missiles deep inland and to search for mines or submarines using remote-control underwater craft. Other daughter craft could be configured to put commandos ashore.

They could also be used to police the coastline as they would have the speed to chase drug smugglers’ speedboats.

The navy declines to discuss the project officially because, sources say, it does not want to detract from its priority of securing funding for its two new aircraft carriers.

However, an FSC project team has been formed under Captain Tom Cunningham, previously requirements manager for the new aircraft carrier project, and an announcement of his appointment is expected soon. Results of initial studies are expected next summer.

The prospect of a fleet of small, fast, specialist boats is one reason why senior navy officials are sanguine about expected cuts in the numbers of destroyers and frigates.

Hoon signalled the move in the Commons last week when he said: “Some of our older vessels contribute less well to the pattern of operations that we envisage, and some adjustments will be necessary.”

At the moment many of the navy’s vessels are too slow. In the Caribbean, for example, its anti-drug-running ships regularly fail to catch their quarry.

Last month the 21-year-old Type 42 destroyer HMS Manchester was again outrun by a speedboat carrying Colombian drugs and had to call on a Lynx helicopter to use the down wash from its rotor blades to make the crew abandon its cargo. More than £25m worth of drugs were recovered at sea, but the boat got away and was later found abandoned on a beach.

It is hoped that the new FSC class could replace the current offshore patrol ships, some of which were designed to be fishery protection vessels.

“The Americans are more concerned about the risks they take operating big expensive ships close to land because they designed them for open sea warfare,” said one Royal Navy source. “So are we, because we have many fewer ships.”

The US Navy is planning to build about 50 “littoral combat ships”, the first going into service in about four years’ time. Each will weigh about 500 tons, have a maximum speed of over 50 knots and cost about £60m.

The FSC is likely to be “modular” in design, changing equipment and roles as it rushes out to conflicts. It could carry a series of unmanned craft including helicopters, reconnaissance drones, mini surface boats and small submarines.

Although a “quick look” study contract was awarded by the Ministry of Defence to BMT Defence Services of Bath last March, the mother/daughter idea is just one of several FSC concepts being considered. The others involve much larger ships designed to be faster, stealthier and more adaptable than existing ships.

Most are using the pioneering work of the research vessel Triton, which was launched in 2000 by QinetiQ, the privatised successor to the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency.

A trimaran, it has proved the value of a ship that can go faster and save fuel by displacing less water. The US Navy has already bought two large catamaran freighters from Australia and is looking at trimaran designs.

BMT is also considering a pentamaran that would weigh about 9,000 tons and launch missiles and amphibious commando ships.

The defence ministry said: “FSC will be expected to deliver fighting power from the sea, countering the diverse and less predictable threats of the future, and therefore have adaptable response within a network-enabled environment.”
Zitieren
#48
[quote]HMS Astute will displace 7,800 tonnes dived and is 97 metres long, she will have six weapons tubes a massively increased firepower compared to predecessors and will be equipped from day one to operate cruise missiles.
The Astute Class submarines will be built with six 533 mm torpedo tubes and they will be able to carry a total of 36 torpedoes, missiles and mines. Weapons will include the Spearfish torpedo and Submarine-Harpoon anti-ship missile.The Astute Class submarines will also carry Tomahawk.
[quote]7800 tonnes ? Das ist mal neu
:evil: Vorher hab ich immer von 6000 t surfaced, and 6800-7200 t dived gehört bzw gelesen. Vielleicht träumen die Britons an die Virginia-Klasse, die die 7800 t tatsächlich erreicht, dafür aber 115 m lang ist, d.h. 18 m länger als die HMS Astute. :lol!:
Vielleicht benützt man hier noch "short tons" (1 shtn = 0,907 "metric tons")
Oder gab es einen Gewichtsund Volumen-Zuwachs, das auch den erhöten Preis begründet, und die Bauproblemen.

Vor 6 Jahren war ihre Indienstellung für Ende 2003 geplant, jetzt Mitte 2008...
Zitieren
#49
7800 tonnes macht das mit den short tons glaube Ich deutlich.Sp weit Ich weiß ist das ebendiese Schreibweise.
ton=1000kg;
tonne=907kg;

Wobei die Royal Navy eigentlich seit zirka zehn Jahren mit Imperial Measures(also:Yard,Foot,pound,stone usw.....) aufgehört hat.
Zitieren
#50
Desweiteren würde Ich sagen dass die AStute(HMS Astute) 2001 Kiel gelegt wurde und 2008 in Dienst gehen soll.
Die Virginia wurde 1999 auf Kiel gelegt und wird wahrscheinlich 2006 in Dienst gehen.
Beide Male eine Spanne von 7 Jahren..........
Zitieren
#51
"Die Virginia wurde 1999 auf Kiel gelegt und wird wahrscheinlich 2006 in Dienst gehen."

Das ist mal was neues: soweit ich weiß muß die Virginia Juni 2004 in Dienst gehen.

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d03895r.pdf
http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/nssn.htm

Das sind ja nur noch 5 Jahren Spanne...
Zitieren
#52
Die Seite von der Ich das habe scheint dann wohl veraltet.
Zitieren
#53
VIRGINIA (SSN 774): Baubeginn (Groton) 1998, Auslieferung Juli 2004, in Dienst Stellung 2006
Quelle:
http://www.globaldefence.net/deutsch/sp ... rginia.htm
Zitieren
#54
@Holger:Ah eben das habe Ich nämlich auch auf der Navaltechnologyseite gesehen.Also doch beide 7 Jahresspanne,bzw. Virginia sogar 8 Jahre.
:daumen:
@DundF:Bei deinem ersten Link steht auch delivered NICHT commissioned.
:baeh:
Zitieren
#55
Dear Rob, sorry for being to mild with you Wink

Virginia: ordered 1998, sea trials March 2004, so July 3004 must be ISD

Astute: http://pub165.ezboard.com/fwarships1dis ... 3122.topic

Echt zu Schade :hand::juhu:
Zitieren
#56
Zitat:so July 3004 must be ISD
Heißt natürlich 2004...

Die Amis haben offensichtlich von der achtjährigen Bauzeit der SSN-21 Seawolf etwas gelernt.
Zitieren
#57
Schau ma mal.
Und wenn schon,zum letzten Mal,Ich habe nicht gesagt dass Astute das Vorbildprogramm aschlecht hin ist,von daher verstehe Ich nicht deine konstanten Flameversuche.
Zitieren
#58
Zitat:Rob postete
Schau ma mal.
Und wenn schon,zum letzten Mal,Ich habe nicht gesagt dass Astute das Vorbildprogramm aschlecht hin ist,von daher verstehe Ich nicht deine konstanten Flameversuche.
So etwas nennt man nicht Flameversuch, sondern Diskussion. Wir sind hier nicht im WAFF, wo jeder Widerspruch gleich als Flame abgetan wird oder werden muss. Also, diskutiert schön weiter, alles andere ist
:ot:

Wink
Zitieren
#59
Mal ne Frage zum Typ 45 dieser Zerstörer soll zur Luftraumverteidigung jeweils 24 Aster 15 und Aster 30 haben.Meine Frage ist ob diese Systeme plus den CIWS(Gatlings)zur Nah-Kurzstrecken und Mittelstreckenbereich ausreicht bwas meint ihr?
Also ich finde es reicht,was mich grübeln lässt ist die F124 im Vergleich die über RIM-116,ESSM und SM2-Block3 haben soll sind das nicht dann zuviele verschiedne Systeme(dazu noch CIWS Gatling)?
Wieviel wird der stückpreis der typ 45 betragen?
Zitieren
#60
Zitat:Azrail postete
Mal ne Frage zum Typ 45 dieser Zerstörer soll zur Luftraumverteidigung jeweils 24 Aster 15 und Aster 30 haben.Meine Frage ist ob diese Systeme plus den CIWS(Gatlings)zur Nah-Kurzstrecken und Mittelstreckenbereich ausreicht bwas meint ihr?
Also ich finde es reicht,was mich grübeln lässt ist die F124 im Vergleich die über RIM-116,ESSM und SM2-Block3 haben soll sind das nicht dann zuviele verschiedne Systeme(dazu noch CIWS Gatling)?
Also manchmal verstehe deine Postings nicht:
Vergleich: F-124 / Type 45
Lange Reichweite: SM-2 / Aster 30
Kurze u. mittlere Reichweite: ESSM / Aster 15
Nahbereich: RAM / Goalkeeper?!

So, und jetzt erkläre mir mal warum es bei der F-124 zuviele verschiedene Systeme sein sollen, während es bei dem Type 45 okay ist.

Zitat:Wieviel wird der stückpreis der typ 45 betragen?
Hehe, darüber haben wir hier schonmal gesprochen Wink
Zitieren


Gehe zu: