Russische Streitkräfte
#1
Irgendwie passt das nicht zu dem, was ich hier oft über die russischen Streitkräfte lese:
http://www.sueddeutsche.de/sz/politik/red-artikel577/
Zitat:Tote Armee

Der Zustand der russischen Streitkräfte wird immer desolater
(...)
Selbst Generalstabschef Anatolij Kwaschnin räumte vor einiger Zeit eine „mehr als kritische Situation“ ein. „Überdimensioniert, schlecht ausgerüstet, mangelhaft ausgebildet und inkompetent“ – so urteilt der russische Militärexperte Pawel Felgenhauer über die Streitkräfte.
Zitieren
#2
So einen propaganda Text habe ich schon lange nicht gelesen!:laugh:
Sehr seltsam ist auch das kurz vor den Wahlen alle westlichen Medien den Putin mit negativen Schlagzeilen fertig machen.
Zitieren
#3
Und was meinst du dazu Pascha ?? :evil:

Russia: War Games Misfire, But Public Officials, State Media So Far Largely Silent


(Source: Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty; issued Feb. 18, 2004)


Military war games designed to highlight Russia's ballistic missile capability have turned into a major embarrassment. Yesterday, two submarine-fired intercontinental missiles failed to launch, as Russian President Vladimir Putin looked on. Today, another missile self-destructed as it veered off course shortly after being fired. Accounts of the mishaps are filtering into the Russian press and are once again raising questions about the state of the Russian military. The authorities, following past practice, are so far keeping silent.


PRAGUE, Czech Republic --- For the past three days, Russian President Vladimir Putin has been the observing war games in the Far North that were meant to highlight the prowess of the country's military.

Yesterday, Putin -- in his capacity as commander in chief of the Russian armed forces -- stood on the bridge of the Arkhangelsk submarine, scanning the choppy waters of the Barents Sea, ready to witness the launch of two intercontinental ballistic missiles from another nearby submarine.

It was a picture-perfect scene, except for one thing. The cameras rolled, Putin waited, and waited. But nothing happened.

After 25 minutes without a launch, the Russian leader disappeared below deck. Russian news agencies began to speak of a technical malfunction. Soon, more unconfirmed details began to emerge on independent Russian-language news sites.

One version -- again unconfirmed -- said the missile launches were blocked for an unknown reason by a satellite signal. Another version said one of the missiles had misfired, forcing the cancellation of both launches.

After a long silence, Navy Chief of Staff Admiral Vladimir Kuroyedov told a briefing the missile tests had actually gone according to plan. They were meant to be "virtual" launches, he explained.

If that convinced anyone, today's report that another intercontinental ballistic missile self-destructed as it veered off course shortly after launch from the Barents Sea came as undeniable confirmation of trouble.

This time, Putin was not present to witness the mishap. But the impact is expected to be severe.

The military exercise was meant to demonstrate the readiness of Russia's ballistic missile forces to the world. The effect appears to have been the opposite.

Russians vividly remember the sinking of the Kursk submarine in August 2000, which was also on a training exercise in the Barents Sea. This week's maneuvers were designed in part to exorcise bitter memories of that tragedy.

Again, the result served to highlight the poor state of the Russian navy rather than to demonstrate its renaissance, as Pavel Baev, an expert on the Russian navy and a senior researcher at the International Peace Research Institute in Oslo, Norway, explains to RFE/RL.

"The exercise, at least the naval part of it, was definitely designed to be a kind of closure on the whole Kursk affair, to make the point that this page is closed, that [Russia] is now in a new period, which would confirm Putin's statement from last autumn, that the military reform is over and that [Russia] is now in the stage of a normal buildup of military forces," Baev said.

Putin has not spoken publicly about the mishaps so far. But experts such as Baev say they are not surprised at the outcome. While some new investment has gone into the armed forces in recent years, the navy remains woefully underfunded and is essentially the same as in the year 2000.

To a large extent, many experts say the degradation of what was once a well-oiled operation is not the fault of the navy command. The navy is being asked to accomplish too many tasks, with too few resources -- from establishing new coastal patrols around Russia's vast perimeter, to increasing its regional presence in the Caspian Sea, to maintaining a battle-ready, strategic component.

Sophisticated ships and the nuclear-weapons systems they carry require sustained, major investment. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the navy has been starved of funds. Even when Russia's overall defense budget was boosted, beginning in 2001, the navy failed to receive an increase in its budget allocation.

The result is evident today, as Baev notes. "The exercise, at least the naval part of it, was definitely designed to be a kind of closure on the whole Kursk affair."

"You can starve your army for a long time, and it still can fight. But as far as naval systems are concerned, try to do the same and they just fall apart. They are not very resilient to 'starvation.' And then, if you invest a little extra money here and there, you can probably clean the ships, you can probably buy some diesel fuel, so you can take them out to sea, but the risks that something could go wrong are just really beyond any rational calculation," Baev said.

Regardless of who is to blame for the state of the Russian navy today, the reaction of its top brass to misfortune -- public denial -- is all too familiar. But here, says Baev, the military has less to worry about than it did in 2000.

"I don't think there is anything else they can really do. Face-saving is incredibly important for the military. And if any lessons, in fact, were drawn from the whole Kursk affair, it is about controlling information better, it is about what sort of spin to put on events. And, in fact, they are hardly under any pressure to do anything, because the whole flow of information in the country is now so much more controlled," Baev said.

Russia's state-controlled television channels today focused on the successful launch of a military satellite from the Plesetsk cosmodrome and repeated shots of Putin in navy uniform lunching with cadets

http://www.defense-aerospace.com/cgi-bi ... ele=jdc_34
Zitieren
#4
Und wenn auch eine Rakete einen Fehlstart hatte sagt das noch garnichts über die russ.Armee aus!
Glaubst andere Staaten haben keine Pannen.
Die Reformen in der russ.Armee dauer erst 2 Jahre und man kann nicht so schnell so eine grosse Armee reformieren und schon garnicht nach dem was in den 90er in Russland abging. Wink
Zitieren
#5
Pascha ich bin irgendwie nicht überzeugt. Der russische Generalstabschef spricht von einer "mehr als kritischen Situation", Raketen stürzen bei Tests vor Regierungschefs ab, Tschetschenien ist kein Ruhmesblatt für die Russen.

Halte den Artikel für glaubwürdig, die SZ ist eine der bedeutendsten dt. Tageszeitungen, glaube daher nicht, daß diese "Propaganda" betreibt.
Zitieren
#6
@bastian

Jedes Land betreibt Propaganda!

Der Fehlstart wird in den westlichen Medien so übertrieben dargestellt das es schon langsam lächerlich ist.
Zum ersten gibt es keine Fakten über die Umstände des Fehlstarts und die Quelle (eine unbekannte Internetzeitung) die ein paar Theorien in die Welt setzt ist auch nicht gerade sehr glaubhaft.
Und wenn der Generalstabschef Anatolij Kwaschnin sowas gesagt hätte wäre er schon lange nicht mehr im Amt.:hand:

Das die russ. Armee im Moment nicht im besten Zustand ist entspricht der Wahrheit.Aber so schlimm wie es im Westen dargestellt wird ist es schon lange nicht mehr.
Zitieren
#7
Noch ein Artikel zum Thema.
http://www.nzz.ch/2004/02/18/al/page-article9EZ0S.html
Zitat:Russland zelebriert seine neu-alte militärische Kraft
Putin bei umfangreichen Manövern im Norden - Übung mit strategischen Waffen
Präsident Putin hat an Bord eines Atom-U-Boots gross angelegte Manöver der russischen Streitkräfte beobachtet, in deren Rahmen auch strategische Waffen eingesetzt werden. Verschiedene Kommentatoren wunderten sich über die auffällige Machtdemonstration weniger als vier Wochen vor der Präsidentenwahl.
Zitieren
#8
@Pascha
Es kann halt nicht sein, was nicht sein darf. Nicht wahr?
Und wenn man russiche Panzer mit nem Preßlufthammer vom Rost befreien muß, die russischen Streitkräfte sind top.
Aber tröste Dich, um die Bundeswehr ists teilweise auch nicht besser bestellt:evil:
Zitieren
#9
@Pascha
Zitat:Quelle (eine unbekannte Internetzeitung)die ein paar Theorien in die Welt setzt ist auch nicht gerade sehr glaubhaft.
Die SZ ist sicherlich keine unbekannte Internetzeitung Die SZ ist eine der größten überregionalen Tageszeitungen Deutschlands. Die Meldung vom Fehlstart der Raketen lief durch sämtliche Teile der Presse.

Wenn du es nicht glauben willst, lass es bleiben.
Zitieren
#10
Zitat:bastian postete
@Pascha
Zitat:Quelle (eine unbekannte Internetzeitung)die ein paar Theorien in die Welt setzt ist auch nicht gerade sehr glaubhaft.
Die SZ ist sicherlich keine unbekannte Internetzeitung Die SZ ist eine der größten überregionalen Tageszeitungen Deutschlands. Die Meldung vom Fehlstart der Raketen lief durch sämtliche Teile der Presse.

Wenn du es nicht glauben willst, lass es bleiben.
Also die Hersteller von den EF Lenkwaffen haben auch so ihre Schwierigkeiten... und das ist das selbe.
Der Umbau der russichen Streitkräfte, von einer Massenarmee mit den Auftrag die Nato konventionel zu überrennen, dazu die massiven Einschneidungen im Budget und dazu noch die Umgestalltung der Nationalen Rüstung ist in so einem grossem Land, dem grössten der Erde ganz sicher nicht gerade einfach un in weniger als 15 jahren zu Schaffen. Die Russen werden dem Fehlstart gelassen entgegen schauen, da Sie immernoch führend aud dem Gebiet der Raketentechnik sind.
Zitieren
#11
@bastian

Zitat:Die SZ ist sicherlich keine unbekannte Internetzeitung Die SZ ist eine der größten überregionalen Tageszeitungen Deutschlands. Die Meldung vom Fehlstart der Raketen lief durch sämtliche Teile der Presse.
Die SZ war nicht die Quelle für die russ.Fehlstarts sonder eine Internetzeitung die SZ hatt dann nur das Thema aufgegriffen!

@tom

Zitat:Es kann halt nicht sein, was nicht sein darf. Nicht wahr?
Und wenn man russiche Panzer mit nem Preßlufthammer vom Rost befreien muß, die russischen Streitkräfte sind top.
Das die russ.Streitkräfte in einem top Zustand sind habe ich nie gesagt!
Aber das ist auch kein Wunder da die Streitkräfte über 10 Jahre fast überhaupt kein Geld bekommen haben.Erst ab 2001 geht es langsam wieder Berg auf mit der russ.Armee.

Und der Zustand der russ.Streitkräfte ist schon lange nicht mehr so wie er hier im Westen so gern dargestellt wird.Wink
Zitieren
#12
Es ist sicherlich dass nicht die Frage dass Russland gute Waffen nicht herstellen kann!Dass kann Russland ohne Frage!Dafür gibt es genug Beispiele!
Dass Problem ist doch dass nicht dass Geld da ist um genügend neue
Waffen in Supermachtgrößen einzuführen und alte Waffen entsprechend zu warten!In Zukunft könnte es besser werden aber dass glaube ich erst wenn ich es sehe!Einn weiteres Problem ist doch dass Russland immer noch dass Ziel hat mit Amerika gleichauf zu sein was auf lange Zeit utopisch sein dürfte!:evil:
Zitieren
#13
Zitat:Dass Problem ist doch dass nicht dass Geld da ist um genügend neue
Waffen in Supermachtgrößen einzuführen und alte Waffen entsprechend zu warten!In Zukunft könnte es besser werden aber dass glaube ich erst wenn ich es sehe!Einn weiteres Problem ist doch dass Russland immer noch dass Ziel hat mit Amerika gleichauf zu sein was auf lange Zeit utopisch sein dürfte!
Das Geld wird schon in ein paar Jahren da sein.Wenn man die letzten vier Jahre die russ.Wirtschaft ansieht hatt Russland grosse Schritte nach vorn gemacht.
Aber du hast Recht man sollte abwarten wie es in 5 bis 10 Jahren aussieht.
Zitieren
#14
@Pascha
Zitat:Und der Zustand der russ.Streitkräfte ist schon lange nicht mehr so wie er hier im Westen so gern dargestellt wird.
Ich weiß nicht wie er im Westen dargestellt wird. Ich sehe nur regelmäßig Bilder von vor sich hinrostenden Schiffen, Panzern und Flugzeugen. Davon ein großer Teil aus Rußland. Ob sich wirklich etwas tut kann ich nicht sagen aber immerhin scheinen die Russen inzwischen wieder zu reparieren. Gut möglich das in 10 Jahren wieder einiges Ok ist, wir werden sehen.
Zitieren
#15
Zitat:Wenn man die letzten vier Jahre die russ.Wirtschaft ansieht hatt Russland grosse Schritte nach vorn gemacht.
Stimmt, aber der ganze Wachstum beruht viel zu viel auf dem Export von Rohstoffen, in dem Fall (Öl und Gas) und naja die Rüstungsindustrie hat zur Zeit einen Boom.
Aber bevor wieder das große Rüsten beginnt:bonk:, sollte das dazu gekommen Geld erstmal dafür verwendet werden, das Angestellte in Staatsbetrieben nicht monatelang auf ihr Gehalt warten müssen, das Lehrer und Ärtze anständig bezahlt werden, das Krankenhäuser genügend Geld bekommen um z.B. die Mehrwegsprtizen abschaffen und Einwegspritzen benutzen - dadruch könnte sich die grawierende Zahl von Tubakolose und Aids Infektionen vermindern- das Weisenhäuser ihre Kinder nicht täglich mit Grießbrei füttern und und und......
Dem, ich sag mal, der Supermacht Sowjetunion nachtrauernden Putin, sollte mal klar werden, das Russland im Moment andere Prioritäten haben sollte.
Zitieren


Gehe zu: